Scientific Program

Day 1 :

  • Increased Uncertainty in Agriculture
Speaker
Biography:

Deepak Khare has been working in the area of Water Resources Management, Climate Change, Water Resources & Crop Planning in Canal command etc. He has published more than 200 research papers and guided 18 Ph.D. theses and 90 M.Tech dissertations. Received many awards, prominent ones are four (04) national awards. Also received Outstanding Teacher Award by IIT Roorkee and ‘Global Water Leadership Award”, 2016. He has made significant contributions in water management strategies for water resources projects and optimal utilization of surface & ground water to achieve optimal cropping pattern, which yields maximum crop yield. His present area of interests is mainly related to climate change studies for water resources projects, river basin, canal command, urban water management etc.

Abstract:

Satellite data provide a wide approach for estimation of crop data even before harvesting. So that government and user will prepare according to estimated production. This also helps us to identify crop disease and area with lower production. A survey was required to drive relation between satellite data and ground data of crops so, survey has been conducted in at the end Kharif season. It was planned to collect information from farmers and collection of GPS point and even Geotagged photos. All GPS data collected in digital format and crop attribute defined on the spot during survey. During survey, we have approached places which were difficult to approach. Interacted with farmers and collated photo and High definition video of all work. We have collected data from 24 villages of Tawa command area, (Water Resources Project on Narmada River, India), 541 GPS points with attributes, 550 Geotagged Photo and Videos and extensive survey was made from selected farmers from command area. Questionnaire and Survey code used. Then all data collected from farmers converted to digital format for analysis. All GPS data is processed by GIS model and represent as spatial distribution of cropping pattern. Secondly, Crop distribution map is generated by combining field and satellite data. For kharif session it is very rare we get clout free satellite image when leaf area of crop is maximum, but we have carefully selected an image with minimum cloud cover. For Rabi season, we have also obtained cloud free image with maximum growth period. Then we have tested and developed various model for crop yield and distribution analysis. Our Model contain linear and experimental tested model. Both model provide almost same result and even we calibrated our model because have actual field data. So, generated maps also shown in the present paper and methodology is also explained. It is found during survey yield production of crops is improving if we compare old data of government. Satellite image also show health index of command discussed in this paper. Present study highlight the change in cropping pattern after the canal project was commissioned before four decades. The design discharges at different location so of canal system at the time of project conception needs to be evaluated under existing conditions as per present practices of cropping pattern, the paper discusses these issue in detail.

 

  • Climate Change And Environment

Session Introduction

Olalekan S. Fatoki

Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa

Title: Climate Change and Drought: Potential Impact of Emerging Contaminants in Water Systems on Biodiversity
Speaker
Biography:

Olalekan S Fatoki hold a PhD in Chemistry and his field of research is in analytical environmental chemistry. His expertise lies in trace organic analyses using various analytical tools for their detection in different matrices and on remediation with nanomaterials. His work has focused on endocrine disruptors - organochlorine pesticides (OCPs, e.g., DDTs), phthalates, phenols, PAHs and organotins but recently he has focused on emerging contaminants (ECs) - brominated flame retardants (BFRs), PFOA, PFOS and pharmaceuticals, looking at alternative methods of determination, assessing their levels and health risks and investigating their remediation. EDCs could impact on human health, hence his interest.

 

Abstract:

South Africa as a country is water stressed but the growing effects of climate change with its extreme weather conditions and erratic rainfall pattern is aggravating the situation with incidence of droughts in many parts of South Africa. As a result of the impact of drought, water security will be a concern for many years to come in the city with consequent effects on people’s livelihood.  One of the water management strategies being affected by government is wastewater reuse both for domestic and agricultural uses. However with the increasing concern on the occurrence of some pollutants of emerging concern many of which are endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), there are concerns that these chemicals can pose ecological health risk especially as current technologies being used by many municipalities for wastewater treatment are not equipped to remove these chemicals before they are being discharged into the receiving water systems. Our studies in the Cape Town environment have indicated the presence of EDCs, such as Brominated flame retardants (BRFs), Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and pharmaceutical residues in wastewaters.  Results of ecological risk tests showed varied levels of toxicities, including oestrogenicity which could affect the biodiversity of the ecosystem in the receiving waters.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Joshua Amuzu Conduct environmental research on topics such as Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation, Vulnerability Assessment and Livelihood improvement at the household to the regional level. Carry out research on climate change and its variability (i.e. drought and flooding) as it affects crop and animal husbandry in West Africa. Conduct climate change education and environmental protection through a weekly radio program. Conduct consultancy services for institutions and published four research articles in international peer-reviewed journals like mdpi.org.

Abstract:

Global Climate Change is one of the dire challenges facing the international community today. Coastal zones are vulnerable to its impacts. An effective approach with long-term prospects in addressing climate change impacts is it’s mainstreaming into development agenda of sectoral policies. A comprehensive risk and vulnerability assessment is a pre-requisite to ensure that the right adaptive response is taken for effective integration into developmental plans. The objective of this study is to evaluate and prioritize risks, vulnerability and adaptation issues of current and anticipated impacts of climate change on the coastal zone of The Gambia. The study will also give a methodological contribution for assessing risks, vulnerability and adaptation from the sub-national to local levels. The relevance of this study will be to create a link between the sub-national and local levels in order to facilitate the integration and mainstreaming of climate change into sectoral and local policies for more climate-resilient communities. This will aid in the promotion of strategic investment of constrained developmental resources to actualize successfully dynamic coping strategies, elude ‘maladaptation’ and less compelling responsive measures. A purposive expert sampling technique was used in selecting respondents for the study. A workshop was organized for the development and validation of the impact risk and vulnerability matrix for the study area. Later, stakeholder consultations were made for further information to support the results. To minimize the error associated with this sampling technique, a quota of 20 experts were selected from each institution for the workshop. 100 experts were engaged in the workshop. The findings of the study reveal that by the end of the 21st century, the climatic variables likely to have the highest impact on the coastal zone of The Gambia are ‘increased flood severity’ and ‘increased temperature’. The coastal zone of The Gambia showed a high vulnerability to these climate change variables. The suggested adaptive response in addressing the impacts of increased flood intensity in the study area includes; improving regulations for restricting agriculture and livestock grazing activities to improve land cover; strengthening of early-warning systems, among others. The suggested adaptive response in addressing the increase in temperature includes: increase crop diversification and rotation to reduce total crop failure; switching to drought-tolerant crop and animal species, among others.

 

  • Effects of Climate Change
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Mohan Singh Jangra has more than 25 years of experience and expertise in agricultural meteorology, weather forecasting, crop weather relation and crop ecological zoning. He developed crop weather relation models model for different crops based on various climatic and phenological data which are helping in yield forecasting of that crop. He also has a long experience of crop weather forecasting and issuing of real time agromet advisories for agriculture, horticulture, forestry and livestock management in the middle region of north western Indian Himalayas. The economic impact assessment of the agromet advisory services showed farming and other end user stakeholders are getting an increased benefits 5-10% from the services

Abstract:

The uncertainty & variability in rainfall amount and distribution are increasing over northwest Indian due to global warming and the climate change. This variability is affecting the agricultural production specially the fruit crops grown under rainfed conditions. The critical information on rainfall rends and its zoning would be selection tools of crop and cultivars in the study area. Rainfall data of twenty-two meteorological stations (35 years) co-located in the study area. The rainfall data was computed and analysed for different stations, regions and trends were evaluated using regression trend analysis. The map of north-west India was digitized and different rainfall zones were delineated using GIS software. Normal annual rainfall was found more than one thousand millimetres at eight stations and ranged between 500-900 mm at eleven stations and between 200 to 500 mm for remaining three stations. The rainfall variability was found less than fifty per cent for all the stations. The trend was decreasing at nine stations but increasing at thirteen stations. The increasing trend in annual rainfall at most of the stations might be due to regional warming which resulted in high convection currents. Increase in water vapors in atmosphere may be due to flood irrigation facilities in plains cause more local rains. The isohyets of higher rainfall were spreading outwards for annual and EGS season but it was contracting towards north during the DS season of the study area. The annual and EGS seasonal rainfall showed an increasing trend in eastern part, decreasing trend in western part and almost no change in central part of the study area. No shift in the month of peak rainfall was observed in hills and whole of the northwest India but, a shift from July to August was observed in plains during present time scale compared to the previous time scale. Steepness in monthly rainfall was decreasing and hence, the distribution among the months toward a smoothing trend.

 

Biography:

Abstract:

The impacts of climate change are significant on both surface and groundwater resources. However, little attention has been given to the effect of climate change on groundwater resources. Therefore, the present study is concerned with the effect of climate change on groundwater recharge and base flow in Tekeze sub-catchment in Ethiopia. The future climate variables were obtained from Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) Africa program for Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) of RCP 2.6 and RCP 4.5 scenarios. The Mann-Kendall test and Sen’s slope estimator were used for trend detection using XLSTAT software package. Further, the downscaled and bias corrected precipitation, temperature, and potential evapotranspiration were used as input to the WetSpa model to simulate future water balance changes. The results indicated a decreasing trend in annual rainfall and an increasing trend in average temperature and evapotranspiration for selected scenarios. At the catchment level, precipitation decreases by 20% for both RCP 2.6 and RCP 4.5 scenarios, and actual evapotranspiration shows 0.4% and 8.1%increment for RCP 2.6 and RCP 4.5, respectively. Consequently, the groundwater recharge decreases by 3.4% for RCP 2.6 and 1.3% for RCP 4.5. Base flow will also decrease by 1.5%and 0.55% for RCP 2.6 and RCP 4.5, respectively. The results of this study would help policymakers, scientists, government officials and local stakeholders in planning and management of the surface and groundwater resources in the Ethiopian regions.

 

  • Indication Of Climate Change